If you’re planning on buying a home in the US, it’s important to know what kinds of homes are available where. There is not one single answer for this question because prices vary wildly across the country. What may be affordable in some states and expensive in others could lead to an unpleasant surprise if your budget doesn’t factor that into your move or purchase decision making process.

The “most expensive counties in california” is a list of 26 counties that are the most expensive to buy a home in. The list was compiled by realtor.com and features some of the priciest counties in California, including Los Angeles County, Orange County, Santa Clara County, and San Mateo County.

26 most expensive counties for US homebuyers

The rising cost of real estate has made it impossible for many residents to purchase houses in their towns in recent years. From 2019 through 2022, MoneyGeek evaluated changes in homeownership expenses, house price appreciation, and median salaries to identify 26 counties in the United States where housing is no longer affordable.

MoneyGeek filtered down counties with populations more than 250,000 and population growth above the national average to obtain our list of recently unaffordable counties. Home price appreciation since 2019, the ratio of homeownership expenses to rent, and homeownership costs as a proportion of median income were all analyzed in these counties.

AaronAmat / iStock contributed to this image.

Clark County, Washington is number 26.

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  • Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington metro area
  • $41,096 in median income
  • The average home costs $430,970.
  • $2,360 per month for home ownership
  • 69 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 26%.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Buncombe County, North Carolina is number 25.

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  • Asheville Metropolitan Area
  • $31,927 median income
  • $315,927 is the median home price.
  • $1,644 per month for home ownership
  • 62 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 40.40 percent.
  • 1.4 Own/Rent Ratio

Warren LeMay / Flickr / Warren LeMay

Arizona’s Maricopa County is number 24.

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  • Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale Metropolitan Area
  • $36,856 median income
  • The average home costs $365,197.
  • Homeownership Cost: $1,876 per month
  • 61 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 42.70 percent.
  • 1.4 Own/Rent Ratio

Wikimedia Commons contributed this image.

Collin County, Texas is number 23.

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  • Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Area
  • $50,681 is the median income.
  • The average home costs $403,500.
  • $2,520 per month for home ownership
  • 60 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 27.00 percent.
  • 1.8 Own/Rent Ratio

Image credit: isockphoto/asiantiger247

Marion County, Oregon is number 22.

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  • Salem Metropolitan Area
  • $31,677 median income
  • $341,919 is the median home price.
  • $1,910 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 72 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 25.70 percent.
  • 1.7 Own/Rent Ratio

Image credit: iStock/thyegn

Colorado’s Jefferson County is number 21.

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  • Denver-Aurora-Lakewood Metropolitan Area
  • $47,438 in median income
  • $536,759 is the median home price.
  • $2,730 per month for home ownership
  • 69 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 32.10 percent.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

arinahabich / istockphoto.com

Thurston County, Washington is number 20.

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  • Olympia-Tumwater Metropolitan Area
  • $40,028 in median income
  • The average home costs $408,162.
  • $2,256 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 68 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 28.90 percent.
  • 1.8 Own/Rent Ratio

Image credit: iStock/John Callery

Charleston County, South Carolina, number 19

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  • Charleston-North Charleston Metropolitan Area
  • $41,782 median income
  • $396,168 is the median home price.
  • $1,988 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 57%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 52.50 percent.
  • 1.4 Own/Rent Ratio

isockphoto contributed this image.

Sarasota County, Florida is number eighteen.

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  • North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton Metropolitan Area
  • $31,933 in median income
  • $325,911 is the median home price.
  • $1,737 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 65%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 54.70 percent.
  • 1.3 Own/Rent Ratio

Flickr user Ebyabe contributed this image.

Pierce County, Washington is number seventeen.

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  • Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue Metropolitan Area
  • $41,269 in median income
  • $425,613 is the median home price.
  • $2,392 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 70%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 36.50 percent.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

www.BenBabusis.com / istockphoto / Ben Babusis

Nevada’s Clark County is number sixteen.

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  • Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise Metropolitan Area
  • $35,145 in median income
  • $358,832 is the median home price.
  • $1,855 per month for home ownership
  • 63 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 47.60 percent.
  • 1.5 own/rent ratio

courtesy of littleny / istockphoto

California’s Merced County

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  • Merced Metropolitan Area
  • $30,889 in median income
  • $329,284 is the median home price.
  • $1,729 per month for home ownership
  • 67 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 44.70 percent.
  • 1.5 own/rent ratio

Publichall provided the image.

14. Washington’s Snohomish County

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  • Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue Metropolitan Area
  • Average Annual Income: $46,920
  • $555,495 is the median home price.
  • $3,020 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 77%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 37.70 percent.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Spokane County, Washington is number thirteen.

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  • Spokane-Spokane Valley Metropolitan Area
  • $33,812 median income
  • $328,400 is the median home price.
  • $1,834 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 65%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 38.60 percent.
  • 1.8 Own/Rent Ratio

ChrisBoswell / istockphoto contributed to this image.

California’s Sacramento County is number twelve.

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  • Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade Metropolitan Area
  • $39,434 in median income
  • $459,373 is the average home price.
  • $2,436 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 74%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 40.80%.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

11. Florida’s St. Johns County

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  • Jacksonville Metropolitan Area
  • Income: $40,897 on average
  • $392,732 is the median home price.
  • $2,131 per month for home ownership
  • 63 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 41.90 percent.
  • 1.8 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Kitsap County, Washington (#10)

Bremerton

  • Bremerton-Silverdale Metropolitan Area
  • $41,214 in median income
  • The average home costs $452,417.
  • $2,463 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 72 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 45.50 percent.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

Ceri Breeze / iStock contributed to this image.

9. Utah’s Salt Lake County

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  • Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area
  • $36,527 median income
  • The average home costs $449,365.
  • $2,334 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 77%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 38.70 percent.
  • 1.8 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Colorado’s Larimer County is number eight.

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  • Fort Collins, Colorado
  • $36,783 median income
  • $471,907 is the average home price.
  • $2,397 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 78 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 43.60 percent.
  • 1.7 Own/Rent Ratio

Marekuliasz / iStock photo

Utah’s Davis County is number seven.

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  • Ogden-Clearfield Metropolitan Area
  • $36,597 median income
  • $428,765 is the median home price.
  • $2,220 per month for home ownership
  • 73 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 34.10 percent.
  • Ownership/Rental Ratio: 2

Scott Catron of Sandy, Utah, provided the image.

Colorado’s Douglas County is number six.

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  • Denver-Aurora-Lakewood Metropolitan Area
  • $55,010 in median income
  • The average home costs $608,917.
  • Homeownership Cost: $3,137 per month
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 68 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 43.40 percent.
  • 1.9 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Nevada’s Washoe County is number five.

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  • Reno Metropolitan Area
  • $37,078 in median income
  • The average home costs $460,647.
  • $2,370 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 77%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 46.90 percent.
  • 1.7 Own/Rent Ratio

Photo credit: istockphoto/photoquest7

4. Texas’ Williamson County

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  • Austin-Round Rock Metropolitan Area
  • $41,446 in median income
  • $378,412 is the median home price.
  • $2,385 per month for home ownership
  • 69 percent of income is spent on housing.
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 58.00 percent.
  • 1.6 Own/Rent Ratio

RoschetzkyIstockPhoto / istockphoto contributed to this image.

Travis County, Texas is number three.

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  • Austin-Round Rock Metropolitan Area
  • $43,376 median income
  • The average home costs $456,690.
  • Homeownership Cost: $2,806 per month
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 78 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 50.10 percent.
  • 1.9 Own/Rent Ratio

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

2. Florida’s Collier County

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  • Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island Metropolitan Area
  • $32,033 in median income
  • $435,313 is the median home price.
  • $2,265 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 85%
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 69.50 percent.
  • 1.4 Own/Rent Ratio

Wikimedia Commons contributed this image.

Idaho’s Ada County is number one.

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  • Boise City, Idaho Metro Area
  • $35,086 is the median income.
  • $452,219 is the median home price.
  • $2,368 per month for home ownership
  • Costs of living as a percentage of income: 81 percent
  • In the last three years, home prices have increased by 59.30 percent.
  • Ownership/Rental Ratio: 2.1

Sean Pavone/istockphoto contributed to this image.

Why is housing in the United States becoming unaffordable?

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The Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price index had climbed 18.6 percent in the previous year by the fourth quarter of 2021. It’s no surprise that almost half of Americans are worried about affordability, questioning whether they can manage rising mortgage payments.

New home development is being slowed by supply chain delays and labor constraints worsened by the COVID-19 epidemic, which means homes aren’t being constructed quickly enough to meet demand. Home prices are rapidly increasing due to a shortage of available properties.

Istockphoto / monkeybusinessimages

Work from home & the housing market

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Increased rates of remote employment are another aspect boosting home demand. According to a Pew Research Center research, 59 percent of Americans who think their professions can be done mostly from home work remotely all or most of the time.

More Americans are choosing for houses outside of pricey cities in more cheap suburbs, where they can get more living space for their money, since they no longer have to deal with long commutes.

“In May 2020, our company took off like a rocket. “Many individuals were spending more time in their homes and working remotely as a result of the epidemic,” says Sharon Ayers, a loan specialist for a big homebuilder in North Carolina. “Families were moving in together and needed additional room, such as a mother-in-law suite,” says the author.

For buyers that can purchase a home, the increasing costs of homeownership — including rising home insurance premiums — can make it difficult for some to keep up with their mortgages. The real estate market is still expected to see rising prices continue to put pressure on affordability in 2022, according to the U.S. News & World Report.

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

Methodology

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MoneyGeek looked at historical home prices, fair market rents, and median mortgage payments from the National Association of Realtors, local property tax rates from SmartAsset, and population growth and median earnings from the United States Census by county to identify counties that had recently become unaffordable.

The counties on the list above that were recently unaffordable matched the following criteria:

  • Populations of above 250,000
  • Population growth is faster than the national average.
  • A 2019 income-to-mortgage-expense ratio of less than 60 percent
  • Since the beginning of 2019, house prices have increased by more than 25%.
  • Monthly homeownership cost more than half of the county’s median income.

The following three elements were merged into a score to arrange the list of places:

  • Price growth since 2019: quadruple the weight
  • The cost of owning vs the cost of renting
  • As a percentage of median income, home ownership expenses

This item was syndicated by MediaFeed.org and first published on MoneyGeek.com.

DepositPhotos.com provided the image.

MediaFeed has more.

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Deposit Photos provided the image.

AlertMe

The “most expensive housing markets in california” is the 26 most expensive counties for US homebuyers. The list includes Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York City.

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  • johnson county richest county
  • most overpriced cities in america
  • richest county in america 2022
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